Knapping

Knapping Knapping is the shaping of flint, chert, obsidian or other conchoidal fracturing stone through the process of lithic reduction. This is to manufacture stone tools, strikers for flintlock firearms, or to produce flat-faced stones for building or facing walls, and flushwork decoration. The original Germanic term “knopp” meant strike, shape, or work. It could…

Bronto Walnut

The Bronto Walnut is the very first idea for a knife that got us involved in knifemaking. The idea was to make a modern metal version of the flint knife, one of the first knives humans made. This resulted in a knife where we replicated the choppy effect of flintknapping as well on the blade…

Carbon Steel

  Carbon Steel Although stainless steel is the most common material for kitchen knives, carbon steel is often the preferred choice of culinary professionals. That’s because a carbon steel blade, when properly cared for, holds a sharp edge better than stainless steel. The flip side is that “proper care” of carbon steel involves a bit…

Santoku Double Oak

The handle of the Santoku Double Oak knife is made of 2 parts of Oak harvested from the same area, but with a 2000 year difference in time. The dark part of this knife has been used as wood for a Roman water well, around 2000 year ago, and the light part was delivered to…

Hunter Olive

The Hunter Olive is a heavy duty outdoor knife.  The Olive wood handle has a curved shape for excellent handling and a sturdy grip.  The knife has a brass lanyard hole on the end of the handle. Its thick blade guarantees you can use the knife for practically anything when being outdoors; wood processing, tool making,…

Chef’s Roman

The Chef’s Roman is a big and bold 30 cm’s Chef’s knife. Its Roman Oak wood handle is securely fixed to the blade by detailed mosaic pins. The Chef’s knife is the most commonly used knife in almost every kitchen. It is a multi-purpose tool that can be used on most fruits, vegetables, and proteins….